Monthly Archives: August 2014

Changing to a different Root Note and Pentatonic Scale

Here’s how you change to a different Root Note or Pentatonic Scale.

Let’s randomly choose the E Minor Pentatonic Scale. The Root Note is “E”. Place “Pattern Guide 1” on the Fret Board Chart with “E”s showing in each Red Root Note hole—between frets 4 and 8 (pictured below).

Now this area of the fret board is valid for the E Minor Pentatonic Scale—using the same Pattern Guide as before!

Pattern Guide 1 placed on Fret Board Chart with E Root Notes

Pattern Guide 1 placed on Fret Board Chart with E Root Notes

If you could only memorize one Pattern out of the five, you could use it for any Root Note and Pentatonic Scale and in any Key! Try it out with the CD or backing track in the Key of E or E minor. That’s easy!

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http://www.pentatonicscaleguitarsolotrainer.com/

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What is a Root Note?

A Root Note is the first note in your scale, and tells you which note to line up your Patterns.

For instance, the Root Note of the C Minor Pentatonic Scale is a “C” Note.

“A” is the Root Note of the A Minor Pentatonic Scale.

“F” is the Root Note of the F Minor Pentatonic Scale and so on.

If you know your Root Note or the Key your band is playing in, you can line up the Pattern Guides on that particular note on the Fret Board Chart using the Red Root note on the Pattern Guide. Each Pattern Guide has the Root Notes marked in red. A Root Note could also be a note that has a Sharp or a Flat. For instance, the “C#” Minor Pentatonic Scale has a “C#” as its Root Note.

Placing a Pattern Guide on the Fret Board Chart

Let’s randomly choose the C Minor Pentatonic Scale. You know now that the Root Note is a “C”. Take “Pattern Guide 1” and put it on the Fret Board Chart with “C”s showing in the two Red Root Note holes—between the Nut (white notes on the Fret Board Chart) and fret 4 (pictured below). Now each hole on each string and fret are good for playing the C Minor Pentatonic Scale in that area! You can play any or all the notes in your solo. If you have the kit’s audio CD, or if you have a backing track in the Key of “C” or C Minor, you can try out the pattern.

Pattern Guide 1 placed on Fret Board Chart with C Root Notes

Pattern Guide 1 placed on Fret Board Chart with C Root Notes

Watch the Root Notes Video:

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http://www.pentatonicscaleguitarsolotrainer.com/

Knowing about Notes with Sharps and Flats
If you look at the Fret Board Chart, each fret on each string has a different note, including the six, open strings (the white notes), up to the 13th fret. Some frets have just one letter note name and some have two notes—a Sharp and a Flat. The Sharp looks like a Tic-Tac-Toe game, and the Flat looks like a lower case “b”. Each of these can be a Root Note also. Your music will tell you which to call it.

Sharp and Flat

Sharp and Flat

Fret Board Chart from the Kit

Fret Board Chart from the Kit

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http://www.pentatonicscaleguitarsolotrainer.com/

What are the moveable Pentatonic Scale Patterns?

They are patterns that can be moved across the fret board in any key. They are 3 to 4 fret stretches (if they were wider apart, they’d be harder to play with your four fingers), and each pattern has 12 notes–two per string (pictured below).

Pentatonic Pattern One

Pentatonic Pattern 1 of 5 from the Kit.

The way to use them is to memorize each one; so when your band says, “Play in the Key of C”, you can line them up on your fret board and play a solo.

The kit has the 5 Pattern Guides with punched out finger holes that line up on the Fret Board Chart, where they reveal an area to play in. Each Pattern Guide has a Red Root Note hole that gives a target to place your pattern in a correct area of the fret board. Pictured below are the 5 Pattern Guides and the Fret Board Chart. The kit also comes with an audio CD and 28 page book with lots of examples.

Fret Board Chart and 5 Pentatonic Pattern Guides

Fret Board Chart and 5 Pentatonic Pattern Guides

Thank you for stopping by. More to follow.

http://www.pentatonicscaleguitarsolotrainer.com/

First off, what are Pentatonic Scales?

Pentatonic Scales are five-note scales that give you the choice of notes or sounds to make solos from. There are lots of other scales, but the Pentatonic Scales are widely used in Rock, Blues, Country and Jazz music.

There are two common types the Minor Pentatonic and Major Pentatonic Scales. Each creates a different sound.

The Minor Pentatonic Scale gives the Blues sound, kind of sad or edgy–even good for Heavy Metal music. The Major Pentatonic Scale is happier sounding (loosely speaking) and maybe more used in Country music (think of the “Chicken Reel” song), although either can be used in any music genre.

 

Thanks for stopping by. More to follow.

http://www.pentatonicscaleguitarsolotrainer.com/

Welcome to the Pentatonic Scale Guitar Solo Trainer Help Blog

Welcome to the Pentatonic Scale Guitar Solo Trainer Help Blog. If you have purchased the Pentatonic Scale Guitar Solo Trainer Kit or even if you haven’t, you can find useful information about using the moveable pentatonic patterns for your guitar solos.

You can find out more about it here: http://www.pentatonicscaleguitarsolotrainer.com/

Watch the introduction video:

Pentatonic Scale Guitar Solo Trainer Kit

Pentatonic Scale Guitar Solo Trainer Kit